Hiring Tips for Clinic Owners

Finding the right people, be it administrative staff, junior clinicians or seasoned professionals who can take on leadership responsibilities, is challenging to get right.

Unfortunately, our industry is somewhat reactive when it comes to recruiting new team members, and as a result, we have a statistically high level of turnover. When team members leave, they cost you, the business owner not only in time and effort but also money in the form of hiring, training and up-skilling the new team member.

Here is a simple process you can use when hiring a new team member. Importantly, don’t forget to take the culture and uniqueness of your business into account and adjust the process accordingly.

Step One – Advertising

Advertising a new role isn’t just about choosing a recruitment website and throwing up an ad. Of course, this approach will likely yield some result, but potentially not the one you want. Your ad should be structured to include –

•            The benefits of the role, specific to your company (why someone would want to work here)
•            The expectations of the job spelt out clearly
•            What it’s actually like to work for you (fun, flexible…)
•            What separates you and your business from the rest of the market (why choose you?)
When writing your ad, don’t try to sound like anyone but yourself. Be authentic, open and honest and it will shine through in the copy. For examples of this, jump onto any job site to see the difference between an engaging, authentic ad and all the rest of them.
*Hot tip: have a file on your computer for every role in your business, and attach relevant documentation to that file. Include advertising copy, position descriptions etc.

Step Two – Shortlist

Now that you’ve received a bunch of resumes, it’s time to work out who is worth interviewing. Start by going through the entire list and removing the ones you would never hire. Then, create a “maybe” pile, and a “definitely,” pile.
Now throw out the maybe pile, there is a reason you hesitated.
Get the list down to 3 to 5 good applicants by screening them on relevant criteria. Skillset (obviously), location, qualifications, and any exciting experience that may be useful.

Step Three – Phone Screen

Your time is valuable, so don’t waste it if you don’t have to. Write down five questions you think are essential and phone each of the applicants. These questions might be specific criteria – hours of availability – or they may involve testing their knowledge or experience. Regardless, it would help if you were confident that the answers to these questions are relevant to whether you would hire them or not.
*Hot tip: move fast. Our industry is statistically very speedy when it comes to hiring, so don’t miss out on someone fantastic.

Step Four – Interview

With the shortlist down to a couple of top-notch candidates, it’s time to meet them in person. The most important part of the interview is preparation, not least because it shows respect and professionalism.

Put together a list of questions and make sure you throw in some curly ones to get them thinking. This isn’t just a silly thing that recruiters do, it’s used to stop people reacting predictably, and it encourages them to behave authentically rather than relying on the answers they rehearsed in the mirror.
Remember to re-read the job advertisement and be ready to answer questions like, “what are the long-term opportunities here?” And, “have you thought about expanding into…?”
The job interview is a perfect time to ask about salary expectations, any travel they have coming up, or anything else that could inhibit their ability to do the job, such as time restrictions. It’s no good hiring someone who you desperately need for late nights, only to discover they study at that time.

Step Five – Hire

You’ve found the perfect person; now it’s time to make the offer. Importantly, don’t just jump in and blurt out dollars, see where they are at first.
“So, we really enjoyed your interview. Tell me, are you still interested in the role?”
“Is there anything that would stop you from starting with us?”
Once you know that they are eager to accept the role, you can present it. If there are any potential orange lights, it’s better to deal with them before an offer is on the table rather than having them “think about it for a few days,” while you lose your next best candidate.

Step Six – Induct

There is nothing worse than starting in a new job and finding yourself ignored on the first day. No preparation has been made, and you are expected to begin without training or induction or a general look around the place.
Create a checklist and make sure it includes:

•            Introducing the new person to everyone
•            Showing them where the toilets are
•            Showing them where the best cafe is
•            Getting them to fill in their employment paperwork
•            Telling them all the things that are obvious to everyone who already works there, but maybe not to them.
Growing your team is an evolving process and one that will be unique to you and your business. But with a basic structure in place, hiring new team members can be predictable and even enjoyable.

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